Daily Improvised Dances Become Exhibition at Icebox Project Space April 6-23

2016-03-04 12.18.00

Choreographer Meg Foley Leads Action is Primary
A Visual Art and Performance Exhibition Based Improvisation

By completing and documenting a dance each day, the practice of four dancers culminates with an exhibition and performances this Spring. Choreographer Meg Foley leads Action is Primary, an exhibition of improvisational research and performance. After six months of shared daily improvisational practice, Foley and her collaborators will showcase their research in a month-long presentation at Icebox Project Space (in the Crane Arts Building), 1400 N. American Street. Action is Primary runs April 6-23.

The exhibition will feature both a schedule of live performances and a gallery installation of reflective documents, photos, and video of Foley’s daily 3:15dances as part of her improvisational practice, action is primary. Foley and three collaborating performers: Kristel Baldoz, Marysia Stokłosa, and Annie Wilson have been documenting these daily improvised 3:15dances beginning October 23, 2015 through April 23, 2016. The exhibition is curated by Marissa Perel and facilitated by Jeanine Durning. Tickets cost $20 for the first ticket, and to encourage repeat visits any ticket after the first ticket is Pay-What-You-Can. Tickets are available at http://moving-parts-dance.ticketleap.com. More information on the exhibition and live documentation of the 3:15dances is online at actionisprimary.com.

Foley encourages anyone and everyone to participate. Every day at 3:15pm, do a dance and document what was experienced as best as the person can. This can be a feeling, a place, or movement. What happened? What did it do? What did the dancer bring to it? The practice of 3:15dances is simple; the implication about how we share space is not. The website www.actionisprimary.com documents those who are partnering with Foley’s experiences. Anyone can post online using #315dances.

The Process
Action is Primary is the culmination of a practice Foley has been developing since 2010. In this practice all aspects of the body become material: movement, voice, location, emotion, relationship, attention, and representation. This practice is a meditation on the possibility within the mundane. How do we engage with what’s already present, bring our insides to the outside and the background to the foreground? Can we simultaneously engage in self-determined research and build something together with our fullest, perhaps contradictory, and most multiple selves (as many as we want)?

The experience of navigating these tactics and the degrees of intention and responsiveness in doing so are the choreographic gesture. It is run through with the pleasure of craft, the pleasure of disruption towards new possibility, insistence towards new depths, and doing what you need.

Exhibition Schedule
April 6 – April 23
Wednesday-Saturday, 12 noon-6 p.m.

3:15Dances
Now-April 23 at 3:15 p.m. Wherever you are.
www.actionisprimary.com updates each week with new 315dance documentation.

Dinner Parties
1) Thursday March 17 5:30pm (with host Michèle Steinwald)
3) TBA in April

Performance Schedule
Wednesday, April 6, 7 p.m.
Thursday, April 7, 7 p.m.
Friday, April 8, 7 p.m.
Saturday, April 9, 4 p.m.
Wednesday, April 13, Open Practice
Wednesday, April 13, 7 p.m.
Thursday, April 14, 7 p.m.
Friday, April 15, 7 p.m.
Saturday, April 16, 4 p.m.
Wednesday, April 20, 7 p.m.
Thursday, April 21, 7 p.m.
Friday, April 22, 7 p.m.
Saturday April 23, Open Practice
Saturday, April 23, 7 p.m.

Major support for Action is Primary has been provided by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage, with additional support from the Polish Cultural Institute New York and Insytut Adama Mickiewicza.


About the Artists

Meg Foley is a Philadelphia-based performer, choreographer, and director of moving parts, the name she ascribes to her various dance- and performance-based actions that explore the materiality of dance and physical identity as form. moving parts focuses on making dances for which the meaning is revealed through and derived from the particular process of building them and questions of embodied reality are at the center. Her work has been presented locally by the Philadelphia FringeArts Festival, Bowerbird, and Vox Populi gallery, and beyond in Movement Research at the Judson Church (NYC), Abrons Arts Center (NYC), CATCH! (NYC), the Badass Dance Fun Festival (Toronto), Summerworks Festival (Toronto), and at the Centre for Contemporary Art Ujazdowski Castle (Warsaw.)

Her research has been supported by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage, the Independence Foundation, and through a 2013 Stary Browar Cultural Exchange Residency (Poland). She is creative co-director of The Whole Shebang, an interdisciplinary arts space and studio in South Philly that hosts workshops and classes and provides studio rental to artists at affordable rates. She is the first dance artist member of Vox Populi Gallery in Philadelphia and was a founding member of Mascher Space Cooperative in 2005. She currently dances for Susan Rethorst. As an educator, she teaches at University of the Arts in Philadelphia and Bryn Mawr College, as well as for professionals locally and abroad.

Kristel Faye Baldoz is originally from Delano, CA. Kristel received her B.A. in Dance, Theater and Performance Studies from UC Berkeley. She performs with Philly-based choreographer, Greg Holt, and works at the University of the Arts, where she has assisted in courses for Eiko Otake, Jennifer McGinn and Beth Gill.

Maria (Marysia) Stoklosa – Choreographer and dancer. Studied choreography at the School of New Dance Development in Amsterdam and contemporary dance at the London Contemporary Dance School at The Place in London. Since 2008 she works and lives in Warsaw, Poland.

Annie Wilson has been making work in Philly for a decade, mostly at the radical, magical venue Mascher Space Cooperative. Her work has been presented by JACK, thirdbird, the Center for Performance Research, Mascher, and FringeArts.

Marissa Perel is an artist and writer based in New York. Her interdisciplinary work includes performance, installation, criticism and curatorial projects. She often uses collaboration as a platform for the exchange of disciplines, working methods and discourses with choreographers, composers and visual artists.

Jeanine Durning is a choreographer, performer, and teacher from New York, creating solo and group works since 1998. Her research is grounded in choreography as ontological inquiry – exploring questions of who we are, the nature of perception and relation, and the slippery terrain of invented narratives of self and other.