[PhiladelphiaDANCE.org Listserv] This Friday: Inclusive Contact Improvisation Jam!

Nicole Bindler nicolebindler at gmail.com
Tue May 7 16:48:41 EDT 2019


*Inclusive Contact Improvisation Jam*
co-facilitated by Nicole Bindler and Morgan Andrews
New monthly event <https://www.facebook.com/events/1986465091470505/> at 954
Movement Collective <https://954dmc.weebly.com/programs.html>
2nd Fridays, May 10th~June 14th, 5:45-8:45pm
5:30pm doors~5:45pm warm up class~6:45pm opening circle~8:30pm closing
circle and nosh
$5-15 sliding scale, includes snacks and entrance to the jam (stay for as
long or short as you like)

[image: Savita Patel.jpg]

What is contact improvisation?
Contact improvisation arose out of the dance performance research of a
group of people in the 70's who posed the question: what happens when we
fly through the air and collide with one another? It has since branched off
to become a practice that can be used toward performance, but also as a
social dance that includes somatic methods and hybrid forms such as
acrobatics, theatrical tools, and site specific practices, to name a few.
Through sharing attention, touch, or weight, partners explore the physics
of being in contact, and social questions that could not be addressed in a
solo dance practice.

What is a contact improvisation jam?
A jam is an open gathering for play and experimentation. It is a space
where we can practice contact improvisation without any particular
direction, prompt, or score. However, facilitators will offer tools for
cultivating one's kinesthetic, social, and compositional awareness in the
warm up classes. Those who are less experienced with contact improvisation
are strongly encouraged to attend the warm up class.

Why inclusive?
This jam is a place for rigorous, boring, playful, creative, or lazy
dancing. It's a space where you can come as you are, with all of your
embodied histories, needs, and aesthetics. We will use an intersectional
approach to consent culture by acknowledging the ways that everyone––but
particularly those who come from marginalized populations––has a need for
bodily autonomy and freedom of movement. This kind of consent culture puts
an emphasis on people from dominant populations dialing up their listening,
rather than putting the onus on members of disenfranchised groups to use
their ability to say "no." Jam guidelines and facilitation will support
participants in deepening their consent practice. Participants of all
abilities, shapes, sizes, ages, incomes, backgrounds, and
racial/gender/religious identities are welcome.

954 Movement Collective is a wheelchair accessible space and no one will be
turned away due to lack of financial resources.



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